Embracing Emotional Wellness

May 15, 2014

By Jeff Jones, Clinical Director Community Recovery Resources
Submitted May 8, 2014

Being emotionally well is more than just handling stress. It also involves being attentive to your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, whether positive or negative.

Time waits for no manPeople who are emotionally healthy are in control of their emotions and their behavior. They are able to handle life’s challenges, build strong relationships, and recover from setbacks. But just as it requires effort to build or maintain physical health, so it is with mental and emotional health. Improving your emotional health can be a rewarding experience, benefiting all aspects of your life, including boosting your mood, building resilience, and adding to your overall enjoyment of life.

What is emotional health?
Mental or emotional health refers to your overall psychological well-being. It includes the way you feel about yourself, the quality of your relationships, and your ability to manage your feelings and deal with difficulties.

Good mental health isn’t just the absence of mental health problems. Being mentally or emotionally healthy is much more than being free of depression, anxiety, or other psychological issues. Rather than the absence of mental illness, mental and emotional health refers to the presence of positive characteristics. Similarly, not feeling bad is not the same as feeling good. While some people may not have negative feelings, they still need to do things that make them feel positive in order to achieve mental and emotional health.

Emotional wellness is about finding and maintaining our emotional equilibrium, our feeling rheostat. Emotional wellness is tied up in our ability to self regulate; To bring ourselves into balance when we fall out of it. Balance is that place where our thinking, feeling and behavior are reasonably congruent; where we operate in an integrated flow.

When our emotions are out of control, so is our thinking. When we can’t bring our feeling and thinking into some sort of balance, our life and our relationships show it. Emotions impact our thinking more than our thinking impacts our emotions. Our limbic system, where we experience and process emotion, actually sends more inputs to the thinking part of our brain, i.e. the cortex, than the opposite. (Damassio)

Mental-Hygiene1The essence of Emotional Wellness is good self regulation. Self regulation means that we have mastered those skills that allow us to balance our moods, our nervous systems, our appetites, our sexual drive, our sleep. We have learned how to tolerate our intense emotions without acting out in dysfunctional ways, clamping down or foreclosing on our feeling world or self medicating.

Addiction and compulsive, unregulated behaviors reflect a lack of good self regulation. To maintain our emotional equilibrium, we need to be able to use our thinking mind to decode and understand our feeling mind. That is, we need to feel our feelings and then use our thinking to make sense and meaning out of them.

Signs and symptoms

Next Issue – July 2014: How Do We Learn to Self Regulate?

Want to submit an article, idea, or opinion in our Community Voices section:

  • Submit up to 300 words (not including lists – Top 10, Tips, etc)
  • Please include your name, email address, and phone number for follow up contact
  • Email submissions to mkelley@corr.us

 If you have questions about submitting or would like more information, please contact
Melissa Kelley 530-273-9541 ext. 226 or email mkelley@corr.us

 

Special Guest Speaker, Dr. Christina Lasich presents Foods that Trigger Pain and Relapse

March 10, 2014

Please join us for our second installment of the new Recovery Enrichment Series kicked off in February by coveted speaker, Father Tom Weston. We are pleased to announce that the distinguished Dr. Lasich will be presenting on Foods that Trigger Pain and Relapse. You won’t want to miss this opportunity to be inspired and enrich your journey!  Space is limited so please RSVP right away to reserve your seat.

RES 04_24_2014 FeatureAbout Dr. Christina Lasich
Dr. Christina Lasich, M.D. began her medical career after graduating from the University of California, Davis School of Medicine with honors. Her interests in orthopedics and physical therapy lead her to the field of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. This specialty field serves those with chronic conditions with an emphasis on improving quality of life and independence. After leaving residency training, she returned to her hometown of Grass Valley, CA to open her practice in 2001. She quickly found an underserved population of people with chronic pain, especially women in pain. Her life, her practice, and her book – High Heels To Hormones – all reflect a philosophy that pain is a signal for the individual to improve habits, life-style, and nutrition. She views pain as the ultimate motivator and that pain is also a doorway to transformation.

Continuing Education Credits now available for the upcoming Recovery Enrichment Series: Foods that Trigger Pain and Relapse, Presented by Dr. Christina Lasich, CoRR Medical Director.

Community Recovery Resources is approved to provide two (2.0) continuing education units (CEU’s):
BBS #PCE2459
, CAADAC #5-01-456-0215.

To read more about Dr. Lasich’s remarkable contribution to our community, visit her website. www.healingwomeninpain.comFoods that Trigger Pain and Relapse 4-24-14

April 24, 2014

5:30pm – 7:30pm

The Campus

180 Sierra College Drive

Grass Valley, CA 95945

RSVP to:

Email: srogers@corr.us

Phone: 530-273-7956530-273-7956

Click HERE to view and download flyer

If you have any questions feel free to call Shelley Rogers: 530-586-1088530-586-1088.

Gratitude and Giving go hand in hand

December 2, 2013

Every year about this time, we’re presented with countless opportunities to give. As we gathered to give thanks on Thursday, some of us celebrated in the homes of family or friends. Others shared fellowship with recovery family and friends.

Either way, gratitude for new lives in recovery and hope for those still struggling was in our hearts and minds. But what if there was a day specifically designated to give a gift of hope?

This year, December 3rd has been declared to be Giving Tuesday . . . a day defined by kindness, compassion, and generosity. By giving today, you are partnering with CoRR to help families recover and thrive.

Tell everyone you can about how you give and why it matters, and join a national celebration of our great tradition of generosity.

CLICK HERE to donate online.

https://www.corr.us/donate-on-line/


 

CoRR Campus Announces Capital Campaign

October 16, 2013

 

This fall,  Community Recovery Resources (CoRR) is celebrating the 1 year anniversary of the Campus, and the success of the initial phase of the capital campaign for developing this beautiful resource.

The Campus at dusk
Photo Courtesy of Sugar Pine Studios

Grass Valley—The corner of Sierra College Drive and East Main Street in Grass Valley has the highest traffic count in Nevada County. Close to the hospital, Sierra College, Nevada Union High School and BriarPatch Co-op, thousands travel the intersection daily. On one corner sits a new set of buildings, the innovative flagship of Community Recovery Resources (CoRR). It is here that over 2,000 individuals a year will recover from substance abuse and related mental health challenges, visit their primary care physician, attend health and well-being classes, or obtain pre-employment drug testing.

Having opened in autumn of 2012, The Campus is bringing recovery to Main Street. A $9.3 million dollar loan provided by USDA allowed CoRR to construct the buildings. Now the community is invited to help support The Campus and all the services it provides.

“We’re excited to be offering a full array of out patient programs, detox, residential treatment and transitional housing, child development and drug testing.” says Warren Daniels, CoRR’s CEO. “Now we’re equally excited to announce our Capital Campaign, which will help pay for the buildings housing on-site services taking place within this full spectrum community wellness facility.”

To date, more than $2.3 million dollars have been pledged by local citizens dedicated to supporting services to help resolve what has been identified as the largest challenge facing Nevada County. Another $400,000 was donated by the local contractors who constructed the project. Many donors emphasize they’re not only motivated by the opportunity to alleviate suffering, but also by the economic benefit that the project drives as reduces burden on public systems and taxpayers, and returns individuals to productive  citizens.

“In a 2011 survey of community leaders, substance abuse and mental illness were named as the largest issues facing Nevada County,” states retired Judge Al Dover, who saw first hand the devastating effects of alcohol and other drugs as five generations of addicts paraded through the courts. “I didn’t need to be told of the devastation. I saw it every day in my courtroom.” He continues, “The community has really stepped up to help alleviate the suffering that faces these individuals and their families. As CoRR’s Capital Campaign Chair, I’m proud to be a part of it.”

In making  this announcement of their Capital Campaign, CoRR is hoping to reach those who have not yet been invited to tour the facility and learn more about the programs housed within. Interested parties are invited to contact Deputy Director Ariel Lovett to arrange tours and obtain more information about making a gift to the campaign. “We’re in the process of designing our Donor Wall and want to make sure everyone with interest has the opportunity to get their name up there.”

The Campus was in the planning stages for years.

Fall colors at The Campus ~ Grass Valley

At that time Community Recovery Resources (CoRR) was a relatively small non-profit providing the majority of substance abuse education and treatment services in Nevada County.

When the CoRR Board of Directors and staff read the Grand Jury report they realized they needed to formulate a response as comprehensive and complex as the problem, finding a way to provide more efficiency and better outcomes to those accessing substance abuse and mental health services. They needed to identify all of the places traditional treatment was failing—the places people were slipping through the cracks or failing to access services in the first place—and remove identified barriers or place safety nets under places one might fall out of recovery.

Barriers to Treatment

A major barrier to treatment was the stigma attached to substance abuse and mental health issues. Another was literally being unable to get to services because they were not available in Nevada County or were not located in a single welcoming, dignified, convenient, accessible location. The ability to pay for treatment can be overwhelming and navigating financial assistance is difficult. Moms often had to choose between treating their illness or keeping their children with them.

Barriers to Successful Recovery

In Nevada County there were no detox services available, much less connected to treatment services, so if one successfully completed detox they were congratulated and wished luck—both in connecting with a recovery program with an open bed and in affording it. Families in recovery were provided disconnected services in disparate locations all over the state. Families were not taught about the disease of addiction and how best to support their loved one in recovery. After one successfully completed a residential treatment program they were often relegated back to the same situation that may have led them to seek services in the first place– a dysfunctional family situation, an abusive partner or their drinking buddies. Untreated co-occurring mental health disorders were not being addressed.

A New Model

CoRR began to rethink the traditional model of treatment, recognizing that 70% of those suffering with a substance abuse diagnosis also had diagnosable co-occurring mental health disorders, ranging from mild to severe. It simply wasn’t working to address one without the other. Families needed to be engaged as a whole, whatever that family unit might happen to look like, and services had to be accessible through a variety of funding sources; public, commercial and private pay. The 2005 Grand Jury Report identifying the unsustainable effects of drug abuse to our community was the catalyst that prompted CoRR to design The Campus, a comprehensive substance abuse and mental health treatment facility unlike any in the nation.

We invite you, if you have not already, to be part of this solution, and consider a donation to the Campus Capital campaign. Check out this short and beautiful 9 minute DVD to learn the story. 

For more information, you are invited to visit www.corr.us  or call Ariel Lovett 530-273-9541.

 

 

 

Watch Dr. Nora Volkow Explain How Neuroscience Shapes Drug Policy

February 18, 2013

Posted by Cameron Hardesty on February 11, 2013 at 04:01 PM EST

The National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Office of National Drug Control Policy agree that throughout much of the last century, scientists studying drug abuse labored in the shadows of powerful myths and misconceptions about the nature of addiction. When science began to study addictive behavior in the 1930s, people addicted to drugs were thought to be morally flawed and lacking in willpower. Those views shaped society’s responses to drug abuse, treating it as a moral failing rather than a health problem, which led to an emphasis on punitive rather than preventative and therapeutic actions.

Today, thanks to science, our views and our responses to drug abuse have changed dramatically. Groundbreaking discoveries about the brain have revolutionized our understanding of drug addiction, enabling us to respond effectively to the problem.

As a result of scientific research, we know that addiction is a disease that affects both brain and behavior. We have identified many of the biological and environmental factors and are beginning to search for the genetic variations that contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scientists use this knowledge to develop effective prevention and treatment approaches that reduce the toll drug abuse takes on individuals, families, and communities.

 

Are Drugs Today Really Cheaper, Purer, and More Available Than Ever?

Posted by Rafael Lemaitre on February 12, 2013 at 01:41 PM EST

You’ve probably heard this claim: Despite decades of effort, we’ve failed to make any significant progress in reducing drug use in this country. Some critics go so far as to say that “illegal drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today” than ever before. This is a compelling argument and a powerful sound bite, to be sure. There’s just one problem:

It’s not true.

While gaining a clear picture of the illegal drug market is always a challenge, a vast array of data, research, and surveys reveal long-term trends and shed valuable light on the nature and scope of the drug problem in America. The evidence presented by these sources is vital in our work to meet the President’s mandate of promoting policies grounded in science and research.

So what do the data show?  Simply put, our national drug problem is substantially smaller than it used to be, and progress continues to be made.

Here’s the evidence:

  • According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health – the Nation’s largest, longest-running, and most comprehensive survey on drug use – the overall rate of drug use in America has dropped by roughly 30 percent over the past three decades.
  • More recently (since 2006), the number of past month (current) users of any illicit drug other than marijuana has dropped 16 percent. Driving this decline have been decreases in the number of current users of cocaine (44 percent), meth (40 percent), and prescription drugs (14 percent).
  • The Monitoring the Future study, the most important youth survey on drug use in America, has shown that the overall rate of illicit drug use among high school seniors has fallen by 35 percent since 1979.
  • The same survey of youth drug use reports that the perceived availability of cocaine among high school seniors has dropped by nearly 50 percent since its peak in 1989.
  • According to STRIDE (System to Retrieve Information from Drug Evidence) – law enforcement’s largest forensic laboratory database – cocaine purity over the past few years dropped to levels not seen since reporting began in 1981, indicative of a significant disruption in the U.S. cocaine market. In response, the number of current cocaine users in 2011 dropped significantly from levels in 2002 through 2008.
  • According to the United Nations, “cocaine consumption has fallen significantly in the United States in the past few years. The retail value of the US cocaine market has declined by about two thirds in the 1990s, and by about one quarter in the past decade.”
  • According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, unintentional overdose deaths in the U.S. related to cocaine dropped 41% from 6,726 in 2006 to 3,988 in 2009, the year for which the most recent data are available.
  • Cocaine production in Colombia – the source of most cocaine consumed in America – has plummeted by over 70 percent since 2001.

Again, these facts are proof that we are not powerless against the drug problem in America.  As the President himself has noted, we have successfully made a difference in other areas, like smoking and drunk driving, so there’s no reason to think we cannot continue to achieve the same success with illegal drugs. Our challenge, it’s worth pointing out, is not that we are unable to reduce drug use; indeed, we have made great strides in that effort. The challenge is that rates of drug use are still too high.

Drug use and its consequences continue to place too many obstacles in the way of young people working to achieve their full potential. It still drives violent crime in our neighborhoods, in our cities, and throughout our hemisphere. It still fosters substance use disorders that tear families apart and end too many lives. This Administration will continue working aggressively to address this challenge in a smart and comprehensive way, and with a clear and realistic goal: to reduce drug use and its consequences by 15 percent over the next five years.

We are energized by the ongoing national debate about drug policy reform in America. That’s why we’ve put forth a National Drug Control Strategy that outlines more than 100 specific drug policy reforms that build on the progress we have made thus far. Still, as we engage in this important national conversation about how best to protect public health and safety in America, we must remain focused on using science and research – not ideology or dogma – as our guide in this national discussion.

This is part of a series of blog posts that address myths about federal drug policy. Related: Drug Laws: Why Do We Have Them, and Do They Work?

http://www.corr.us/